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Natural Connections

Modern life in Scotland is increasingly busy. The connections our ancestors had with nature and the land are being lost. As leisure time shrinks, or is filled with hi-tech experiences, opportunities to experience nature become fewer. And yet it is possible to connect with nature on a day to day basis. All around us, the great web of life continues to hold its shape, and nature continues its eternal cycles. Keep looking, listening, smelling, touching - and keep experiencing natural connections.

Sunday, September 05, 2010

Two good birding walks today: an early morning walk around Ardmore Point produced two Bar tailed Godwits, a Red throated Diver, two Great crested Grebes and several flocks of Goldfinches totalling hundreds of birds. Lingering summer visitors included two Chiffchaffs (one in song), a Sandwich Tern and a couple of Swallows. This afternoon's walk down from Balgray Reservoir was disappointingly quiet (too many anglers, I think) but the crows at Ryatt Linn were mobbing a Kestrel, then a Buzzard. A Buzzard was also the victim of corvid harrassment over Pollock Wood (first for the square).

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