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Natural Connections

Modern life in Scotland is increasingly busy. The connections our ancestors had with nature and the land are being lost. As leisure time shrinks, or is filled with hi-tech experiences, opportunities to experience nature become fewer. And yet it is possible to connect with nature on a day to day basis. All around us, the great web of life continues to hold its shape, and nature continues its eternal cycles. Keep looking, listening, smelling, touching - and keep experiencing natural connections.

Tuesday, October 25, 2011


Arrived in Kilmarnock a bit early this morning so took a walk around Kay Park. Plenty of birds were on the pond including Mallard, Coot and Mute Swan all still with dependent young (4, 2 and 1 respectively). Two Goosanders (a male and female) were keeping their distance and a fine Muscovy Duck was also staying out of phone-camera reach.

Heading back to Greenock via the back of Irvine, a group of geese on a flood near Muirhouses looked like, and turned out to be Barnacle Geese (8). In the same field were 18 Canada Geese and two Pink footed Geese.



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