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Natural Connections

Modern life in Scotland is increasingly busy. The connections our ancestors had with nature and the land are being lost. As leisure time shrinks, or is filled with hi-tech experiences, opportunities to experience nature become fewer. And yet it is possible to connect with nature on a day to day basis. All around us, the great web of life continues to hold its shape, and nature continues its eternal cycles. Keep looking, listening, smelling, touching - and keep experiencing natural connections.

Wednesday, April 24, 2013

An evening visit to the south western end of Castle Semple Loch produced some interesting records including plenty of singing Willow Warblers and Chiffchaffs and flyover Cormorants (2), Tufted Ducks (2) and Goldeneye (5). A handful of Swallows and Sand Martins were over the loch, with numbers swelling as the evening progressed. By 8pm, at least 50 House Sand Martins, 20 Swallows and two House Martins were present. A single Whooper Swan was among the Mutes at the car park. 
Siskins were present at three separate sites, reinforcing my impression that they are more widespread and commoner than usual this spring. The latest graph of reporting rates from the BTO seems to confirm this:

  

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