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Natural Connections

Modern life in Scotland is increasingly busy. The connections our ancestors had with nature and the land are being lost. As leisure time shrinks, or is filled with hi-tech experiences, opportunities to experience nature become fewer. And yet it is possible to connect with nature on a day to day basis. All around us, the great web of life continues to hold its shape, and nature continues its eternal cycles. Keep looking, listening, smelling, touching - and keep experiencing natural connections.

Saturday, March 08, 2014

The first frogspawn of the year appeared in the garden pond first thing this morning.
A walk along the river produced two Stock Doves feeding at the water's edge just east of Hawkhead, a Grey Heron and 50+ Lesser Black-backed Gulls in a ploughed field, a Treecreeper beside the path, a Mallard on floods at Leverndale and a Grey Wagtail under Howford Bridge.
Just down from Cardonald Place Farm, a Mute Swan was, I think, my first record in seven years of watching the area (even Whooper Swan got onto my home patch list first). The full list for the 1km square around my house is now:

Mute Swan, Whooper Swan, Canada Goose, Mallard, Tufted Duck, Goldeneye, Goosander, Cormorant, Grey Heron, Little Grebe, Sparrowhawk, Buzzard, Moorhen, Oystercatcher, Woodcock, Common Sandpiper, Black-headed Gull, Common Gull, Lesser Black-backed Gull, Herring Gull, Great Black-backed Gull, Feral Pigeon, Stock Dove, Woodpigeon, Collared Dove, Tawny Owl, Swift, Kingfisher, Great Spotted Woodpecker, Magpie, Jackdaw, Rook, Carrion Crow, hybrid Carrion x Hooded Crow, Raven, Goldcrest, Blue Tit, Great Tit, Coal Tit, Swallow, House Martin, Long-tailed Tit, Chiffchaff, Willow Warbler, Blackcap, Whitethroat, Sedge Warbler, Waxwing, Treecreeper, Wren, Starling, Dipper, Blackbird, Fieldfare, Song Thrush, Redwing, Mistle Thrush, Robin, Dunnock, House Sparrow, Grey Wagtail, Pied/White Wagtail, Pied Wagtail (yarrellii), Chaffinch, Greenfinch, Goldfinch, Siskin, Lesser Redpoll, Redpoll (Common/Lesser) and Bullfinch (70 species).
Also along the river was a patch of naturalised Daffodils.

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