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Natural Connections

Modern life in Scotland is increasingly busy. The connections our ancestors had with nature and the land are being lost. As leisure time shrinks, or is filled with hi-tech experiences, opportunities to experience nature become fewer. And yet it is possible to connect with nature on a day to day basis. All around us, the great web of life continues to hold its shape, and nature continues its eternal cycles. Keep looking, listening, smelling, touching - and keep experiencing natural connections.

Saturday, April 18, 2015

Two Great Tits and a Coal Tit were visiting the garden feeders again today. Their agitated behaviour made me wonder if they were taking food back to young, although perhaps it is too early for that. Hopefully more natural food will become available now that the weather has warmed up.
An exceptionally loud series of high-pitched calls just over the garden fence proved to be being made by two Goldcrests displaying their crest feathers and hopping about in a very agitated state. I must try and find out if this behaviour is typical of a courting pair or rival males.
An afternoon walk along the river produced two Kingfishers, four Long-tailed Tits, a Great-spotted Woodpecker showing well, a hybrid Hooded x Carrion Crow, two Moorhens on Rosshall Park Pond (the most I have ever seen there has been one), two female Goosanders at the Levern / Cart confluence and the Mute Swan pair looking like they are settled on territory. 

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