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Natural Connections

Modern life in Scotland is increasingly busy. The connections our ancestors had with nature and the land are being lost. As leisure time shrinks, or is filled with hi-tech experiences, opportunities to experience nature become fewer. And yet it is possible to connect with nature on a day to day basis. All around us, the great web of life continues to hold its shape, and nature continues its eternal cycles. Keep looking, listening, smelling, touching - and keep experiencing natural connections.

Sunday, February 24, 2019

The usual walk along the river in South Cardonald produced an impressive 34 bird species today. Many were singing or engaging in other breeding behaviour. Perhaps most remarkable were two Song Thrushes which flew round in circles at break-neck speed, only a few cm apart. I have never seen this behaviour before. A Stock Dove was singing near its nest hole and two Mistle Thrushes feeding on a playing field just possibly might have had an early brood. Some slightly unusual species were Kingfisher, Greenfinch, Buzzard and Little Grebe.

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