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Natural Connections

Modern life in Scotland is increasingly busy. The connections our ancestors had with nature and the land are being lost. As leisure time shrinks, or is filled with hi-tech experiences, opportunities to experience nature become fewer. And yet it is possible to connect with nature on a day to day basis. All around us, the great web of life continues to hold its shape, and nature continues its eternal cycles. Keep looking, listening, smelling, touching - and keep experiencing natural connections.

Sunday, April 21, 2019

An early start meant I had Longhaugh Point mostly to myself. Unfortunately, the tide was well out, so any wading birds were probably well out on the mud, and therefore out of sight. The field pools held at least four White Wagtails, a pair of Shelduck and a single Wheatear. A marshy area had a reeling Grasshopper Warbler and the best bird out on the mud was a Little Egret. Rabbit, Grey Squirrel and Roe Deer were seen and butterflies consisted of a Peacock, a Small Tortoiseshell and four Orange Tips. Towards the end of the walk, a beautiful red-flowered shrub was almost certainly Ribes ‘Pulborough Scarlet’, a variety of flowering currant.

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