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Natural Connections

Modern life in Scotland is increasingly busy. The connections our ancestors had with nature and the land are being lost. As leisure time shrinks, or is filled with hi-tech experiences, opportunities to experience nature become fewer. And yet it is possible to connect with nature on a day to day basis. All around us, the great web of life continues to hold its shape, and nature continues its eternal cycles. Keep looking, listening, smelling, touching - and keep experiencing natural connections.

Friday, April 05, 2019

Some unidentified geese flew over the house first thing. I have long thought that these low-flying birds are possibly commuting between the Barrhead reservoirs and either the Clyde estuary or the feeding areas north of Glasgow airport. Later, two Kingfishers were interacting at the local site where I most often see them (although previous records at this site have always involved just one bird). I was alerted to their presence by repeated calling - a shorter, more rapid version of the normal flight call. No doubt this is a pair forming, although the site is totally unsuitable for nesting so presumably they will move away when that time comes. The garden Siskins are still around as I heard the male singing today. Wren continues to be the nmost prominent singer, locally, but two separate Chiffchaffs were singing within earshot of the house.

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