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Natural Connections

Modern life in Scotland is increasingly busy. The connections our ancestors had with nature and the land are being lost. As leisure time shrinks, or is filled with hi-tech experiences, opportunities to experience nature become fewer. And yet it is possible to connect with nature on a day to day basis. All around us, the great web of life continues to hold its shape, and nature continues its eternal cycles. Keep looking, listening, smelling, touching - and keep experiencing natural connections.

Saturday, June 29, 2019

A brief stop at Haydon Bridge this morning produced a good range of common village birds including Mallard, Moorhen, Black-headed Gull, Oystercatcher, Buzzard, Swift, Grey Wagtail, Swallow, House Martin, Sand Martin, Blackbird, House Sparrow and Greenfinch. The Grey Wagtails, Mallards and Blackbirds all had dependent young. Monkey Flower was growing profusely on the old bridge. Later, a short walk along the merse at Gretna produced two Little Egrets, nine Common Sandpipers, four Dunlin, a Knot and a Ringed Plover.

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