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Natural Connections

Modern life in Scotland is increasingly busy. The connections our ancestors had with nature and the land are being lost. As leisure time shrinks, or is filled with hi-tech experiences, opportunities to experience nature become fewer. And yet it is possible to connect with nature on a day to day basis. All around us, the great web of life continues to hold its shape, and nature continues its eternal cycles. Keep looking, listening, smelling, touching - and keep experiencing natural connections.

Wednesday, March 06, 2019

A short stop at Loch of the Lowes this morning produced litle of note due to heavy rain but two Great Crested Grebes were displaying out on the loch and a Red Squirrel was on the feeders. The final bird list for the three days was Greylag Goose, Pink-footed Goose, Mute Swan, Mallard, Teal, Tufted Duck, Goldeneye, Pheasant, Little Grebe, Great Crested Grebe, Little Egret, Cormorant, Buzzard, Feral Pigeon, Moorhen, Coot, Oystercatcher, Lapwing, Curlew, Black-headed Gull, Herring Gull, Lesser Black-backed Gull, Woodpigeon, Collared Dove, Tawny Owl, Great Spotted Woodpecker, Kestrel, Magpie, Jackdaw, Rook, Carrion Crow, Coal Tit, Blue Tit, Great Tit, Long-tailed Tit, Wren, Nuthatch, Treecreeper, Starling, Blackbird, Song Thrush, Mistle Thrush, Robin, Dipper, House Sparrow, Dunnock, Grey Wagtail, Pied Wagtail, Chaffinch, Greenfinch, Goldfinch, Siskin and Yellowhammer (53 species). Main impresion was that many of the residents and partial migrants were well on their way to starting their breeding cycles. The phenomenon of Oystercatchers calling from rooftops in the centre of town is a memorable feature of Pitlochry in spring.

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